Considerable publicity has also been given to the possibility that caffeine may be linked to the development of benign lumps in some women’s breasts, a condition known as fibrocystic disease. However, the FDA review stated, more reliable studies since then have failed to show any relationship “between benign breast disease and coffee consumption.”

Some, but not all studies have found that women with FBD drink more coffee than women without the disease. Eliminating caffeine for less than six months does not appear to be effective at reducing symptoms of FBD. However, long-term and complete avoidance of caffeine does reduce symptoms of FBD. Some women are more sensitive to effects of caffeine than others, so benefits of restricting caffeine are likely to vary from woman to woman. Caffeine is found in coffee, black tea, green tea, cola drinks, chocolate, and many over-the-counter drugs. A decrease in breast tenderness can take six months or more to occur after caffeine is eliminated. Breast lumpiness may not go away, but the pain often decreases.